Theoretical perspectives sociology explain theoretical per

Summarize the most important beliefs and assumptions of functionalism and conflict theory. Summarize the most important beliefs and assumptions of symbolic interactionism and exchange theory.

Theoretical perspectives sociology explain theoretical per

Summarize the most important beliefs and assumptions of functionalism and conflict theory. Summarize the most important beliefs and assumptions of symbolic interactionism and exchange theory. This implication is misleading. Macrosociologists focus on the big picture, which usually means such things as social structure, social institutions, and social, political, and economic change.

They look at the large-scale social forces that change the course of human society and the lives of individuals. Microsociologists, on the other hand, study social interaction.

They look at how families, coworkers, and other small groups of people interact; why they interact the way they do; and how they interpret the meanings of their own interactions and of the social settings in which they find themselves. Often macro- and microsociologists look at the same phenomena but do so in different ways.

Their views taken together offer a fuller understanding of the phenomena than either approach can offer alone. Microsociologists examine the interaction of small groups of people, such as the two women conversing here.

These sociologists examine how and why individuals interact and interpret the meanings of their interaction. Macrosociologists would discuss such things as why robbery rates are higher in poorer communities and whether these rates change with changes in the national economy.

Microsociologists would instead focus on such things as why individual robbers decide to commit a robbery and how they select their targets. Both types of approaches give us a valuable understanding of robbery, but together they offer an even richer understanding.

Within the broad macro camp, two perspectives dominate: Within the micro camp, two other perspectives exist: We now turn to these four theoretical perspectives, which are summarized in Table 1. Slow social change is desirable, but rapid social change threatens social order.

Functionalism is a macro theory. Conflict theory Society is characterized by pervasive inequality based on social class, gender, and other factors. Far-reaching social change is needed to reduce or eliminate social inequality and to create an egalitarian society.

Conflict theory is a macro theory. Symbolic interactionism People construct their roles as they interact; they do not merely learn the roles that society has set out for them. As this interaction occurs, individuals negotiate their definitions of the situations in which they find themselves and socially construct the reality of these situations.

In so doing, they rely heavily on symbols such as words and gestures to reach a shared understanding of their interaction. Symbolic interactionism is a micro theory. Utilitarianism rational choice theory or exchange theory People act to maximize their advantages in a given situation and to reduce their disadvantages.

If they decide that benefits outweigh disadvantages, they will initiate the interaction or continue it if it is already under way. If they instead decide that disadvantages outweigh benefits, they will decline to begin interacting or stop the interaction if already begun.

Social order is possible because people realize it will be in their best interests to cooperate and to make compromises when necessary.Theoretical Perspectives The three main theoretical perspectives in sociology--structural-functionalism, conflict theory, and symbolic interactionism--offer insights into the nature, causes, and consequences of poverty and economic inequality.

Theoretical Perspectives The three main theoretical perspectives in sociology--structural-functionalism, conflict theory, and symbolic interactionism--offer insights into the nature, causes, and consequences of poverty and economic inequality.

Sociology includes three major theoretical perspectives: the functionalist perspective, the conflict perspective, and the symbolic interactionist perspective (sometimes called the interactionist perspective, or simply the micro view). Sociology is the scientific study of society and human behavior.

Webster's Dictionary defines a perspective as a "view of things in their true relationship or importance". Therefore, the sociological perspective provides viewpoints used to look at huma /5(3).

It's important for social sciences, like psychology, economics, and sociology, to follow theoretical perspectives as a framework for understanding phenomena, such as the ways people form groups.

Theoretical perspectives sociology explain theoretical per

Theoretical Views and Practices Supporting In-Context Developmental Strategies in “There are literally dozens of theoretical per- Developmental Education. Theoretical Perspectives. Minnesota. General College, University of Minnesota. General College, University of Minnesota.

Theoretical Perspectives in Sociology